CFHS code : PL343

Parish : St Paul

Inscription : In Loving Memory of FLINDERS CHARLES JACOB d Oct 3 1879 aged 12 weeks also GEORGE JACOB d June 10 1903 aged 61 also ANNIE JACOB d March 31 1939 aged 98

Monument : Headstone/Kerb stones

Above information from Cambridge Family History Society Survey

The headstone in 2015

Monument

Inscription

In Loving Memory of FLINDERS CHARLES JACOB d Oct 3 1879 aged 12 weeks

Also GEORGE JACOB d June 10 1903 aged 61

Also ANNIE JACOB d March 31 1939 aged 98

 

George Jacob (20 September 1841 – 10 June 1903)

George was born near Kimbolton, Huntingdon and was the son of William and Rebecca Jacob.  William Jacob was a journeyman carpenter, and the family were living in Easton Socon, Bedfordshire in 1851 when George was 9 years old.  George’s father had died by 1861 and he was living on Hornsey Road in Islington with his mother and two siblings and working as a carpenter.  He married Annie Newman in Islington on 2nd March 1864 when he was 22 years old.

They had at least 10 children together:  William Newman [1865-1940], George Henry [1867-1956], Henrietta Annie [1869-1938], Louisa Maud [1872-1956], Florence Rose [1874-1958] , Herbert Richard  [1877-1932],Flinders Charles [1879-1879]  Alice Ellen [1880-1978], Percy Charles [1881-1970] and Frank Jacob [1884-1971].

Annie and George’s first three children were born in at their home 19 Lowman Road in Holloway, London. By 1871 they had moved to Cambridge and were living at 17 James Street. In 1881 they were living at 29 Hills Road, and in 1891 at 26 Norwich Street.  George continued to work as a carpenter and joiner throughout his life.

George Jacob was an instrumental founder of the Young Leaguer’s Union in Cambridge, which was an auxillary of the National Children’s Home and Orphanage.  Newspapers of the time frequently referenced his fund raising efforts in aid of the Children’s Home.  A publication of the time paid honour to him after his death:

‘In the removal by death of Mr George Jacob, of Cambridge, The Children’s Home has lost one of the earliest and most faithful of its supporters.  For the past 25 or 26 years he has laboured in connection with the Hills Road Sunday School, and always kept prominently to the front the need of the helpless and destitute little ones, and in the capacity of ‘Leaguer’ it has been his joy to see that school during the last two years figuring upon the ‘Roll of Honour’……an indefatigable Sunday School worker, an enthusiastic Temperance and Band of Hope Leader [being the pioneer of the Band of Hope movement in Cambridge], a dear lover of children, together with the position he held as instructor in carpentering at the Leys School, has brought his life at all points in touch with young people’

He died at 22 Norwich Street aged 61 years old in June 1903.  He left an estate valued at £184, 15s.

 

Flinders Charles Jacob (8 July 1879 – 3 October 1879)

Flinders was the son of George and Annie Jacob.  He died as a small baby.

 

Annie Jacob  [nee Newman] (1841 – 31 March 1939)

Annie was the daughter of Richard and Ellen Newman, and was born in Eltisley, near Cambridge. Her father worked as a carpenter. In 1861 she was working as a domestic servant to the Hopman family in Finsbury, London.  She married George Jacob in 1864 in Islington.

After being widowed she lived at 39 Norwich Street [until c.1929] and then at 63 Mawson Road with her daughter Louisa Maud Austin. She died at Mawson Road in March 1839.

The local newspaper reported:

The funeral of Mrs Annie Jacob, who passed away at the home of her daughter 63, Mawson Road took place on Tuesday.  The first part of the service was held at the house and the interment was at Mill Road Cemetery.  It was conducted by the Rev. G.B. Robson.  The coffin was of English oak, and the inscription read: ‘Annie Jacob, died March 31st 1939, aged 98 years’

 

 

Claire Martinsen

Source: Ancestry/Newspaper archives

 

[If you have any further information about this family, please contact us at Friendsofmillroadcemetery@gmail.com]

Annie Jacob; Flinders Charles Jacob; George Jacob