CFHS code : HT521

Parish : Holy Trinity

Inscription : In Memory of CHARLES EDWARD BROWN d Jan 9 1877 in his 71st year he was a magistrate and alderman of the borough and a deputy lieutenant of the county of Cambridge and for many years intimately connected with the various institutions of the town and county erected by subscriptions of many friends and fellow townsmen side also of ELIZABETH wife of CHARLES EDWARD BROWN b Feb 4 1811 d Jan 6 1891

Monument : Large column with cross on top/Ground slab

Above information from Cambridge Family History Society Survey

Brown monument September 2017

Monument

Inscription

In Memory of CHARLES EDWARD BROWN who died Jan 9 1877 in his 71st year
He was a magistrate and alderman of the borough and a deputy lieutenant of the county of Cambridge and for many years intimately connected with the various institutions of the town and county
Erected by subscriptions of many friends and fellow townsmen.

south face

Also of ELIZABETH wife of CHARLES EDWARD BROWN b Feb 4 1811 d Jan 6 1891

Charles Edward Brown (c.1806 – 9 January 1877)

Charles was baptised in St Michael’s Church, Trinity Street, Cambridge on January 9th 1807. He was the son of James and Sarah Brown. He was brought up in Green Street, Cambridge and trained as a printer like his father. On August 9th 1832 he married Elizabeth Papworth at St Michaels Church. Later that year his father died and at some point both families moved to Market Hill, Cambridge. In 1851 Charles and Elizabeth were living at 26 Sidney Street with their servants Sarah Raynor and Eliza Porter. They later lived at 62 Sidney Street (at least 1861 onwards).

Charles was the owner of the Cambridge Chronicle and  also actuary of the Cambridge Savings Bank for over 40 years.  He first became involved with the Cambridge Chronicle in c.1822 working for the owner Mr James Hodson.  After James’ death he owned the newspaper with James’ nephew before eventually becoming the sole proprietor. He eventually passed the newspaper to new owners.  He was a prominent local politician and magistrate – first elected to represent Market Ward in 1840 and serving two terms as Mayor of Cambridge (1846-1847 and again 1868-1869).

During his first term Prince Albert was made Chancellor of the University and Charles was charged with welcoming Queen Victoria to the town ‘and the manner in which he discharged the responsibilties of his position met with the approval of his fellow townsmen and reflected great credit upon him’. Victoria and Albert arrived on Monday 5 July 1847 by train and were presented with the  mace before travelling by carriage to Trinity College via Downing Terrace and Trumpington Street.  The royal cortege was preceded by the ‘Corporation’ which returned to the Town Hall having left the Royal couple at Trinity College. Victoria received ‘the Address of the University in the Hall of Trinity College’ before Albert went to present Honoury degrees at the Senate House. The couple dined with the Vice-Chancellor at St. Catharine’s Hall and then attended a concert at the Senate House. At ten o’clock there was a promenade and firework display on Parker’s Piece opposite the town goal. The fireworks were overseen by Mr Deck and Mr Darby and promised ‘a national piece – the Rose, Shamrock and the Thistle entwined in brilliant fire, and various others – with the finale which will be the most splendid piece ever exhibited in Cambridge, in a combination of all the powers and beauties of the pyrotechnic art; the names – Albert and Victoria – surmounted with a crown and star, with pyramids of gerbs, forty feet high and flights of hundreds of rockets, will give effect and honour to  the memorable occassion’. The next day Albert presented more degrees at the Senate House and the couple attended ‘the Grand Horticultural Fete’ in Downing Grounds in the afternoon. In the evening a dinner was held at Trinity College attended by gentry, and then a reception at 9pm where ‘the officers of the university, heads of the colleges, professors, vice-masters’ were presented as well as the Mayor and local members of the town’.  That evening Mr Green made a hot air balloon accent from Parker’s Piece in a balloon ‘constructed of scarlet and yellow silk, and will contain 30,000 cubic feet of gas’. Albert and Victoria left on Wednesday afternoon having spent nearly three full days in the town.

Charles Brown was also a founder of the Cambridge Philo Union, Secretary of the Cambridge Horticultural Society. He served as a JP for the borough, and Magistrate. He died after a long ‘painful and distressing malady’ which he was said to have suffered with for twenty years. His obituary said ‘to enumerate all the local affairs in which he took part would be to write a local history of the last forty years, suffice it to say that during the whole of his public ife he has acted consistently and honourably and all classes have joined in recognising his merits as a public man. In his private relation he was thoroughly esteemed as a staunch friend and a liberal employer’.

Elizabeth Brown (née Papworth) (4 February 1811 – 6 January 1891)

Elizabeth married Charles Brown when she was 21 years old and died at Sidney Street.   She was reported to have ‘passed away quite peacefully, while asleep’.

Sources:

Ancestry

Newspaper archives

Parish burial records transcribed by CFHS

by Claire Martinsen 

[If you have any information about this family, please contact us at Friendsofmillroadcemetery@gmail.com]

Charles Edward Brown; Elizabeth Brown
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